Paleo Chili with Fresh Tomatoes
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Paleo Beef Chili with Fresh Tomatoes

Ahhh … chili.

We had a few chilly days (like my play on words?) in Minnesota recently and I thought chili would be good to prepare as a precursor to autumn being right around the corner.

Never too soon to get ready as autumn is my favorite time of year.

This Paleo Beef Chili with Fresh Tomatoes has enough flavor to make you come to your senses yet not too many that you’ll lose your mind. (For those who don’t know yet, I don’t like my food too spicy so add more spice if you feel you need to.)

Here’s the simple recipe for you to try …

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle powder
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • Dash of cayenne pepper
  • 10 cherry tomatoes or 4 medium tomatoes, cut into small pieces
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 yellow pepper, chopped
  • Dash of Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. In a large skillet, melt the olive oil then add the onion and cook until it’s clear.
  2. Add the peppers to the onion and cook until they are soft.
  3. Next add the garlic and stir until everything is well combined.
  4. Add the beef and cook until it’s thoroughly brown.
  5. Add the spices, salt, pepper and make sure everything is well combined.
  6. Allow this mixture to cook through for about 10 minutes then add the tomatoes and cook another 5 minutes.

Next, enjoy!

Paleo Chili with Fresh Tomatoes

Paleo Beef Chili with Fresh Tomatoes

You can serve this atop a bed of lettuce, wrap it in lettuce leaves or enjoy it by itself.

This recipe was adapted from one I found at AllRecipes Paleo Chili.

 

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Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN
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A Trip to the North Shore, Minnesota

This summer we ventured back to the North Shore of Minnesota.  This is a beautiful area to relax and let the mind meander. Although, I have to say, too much meandering makes me overly sensitive. (More on that in another post.)

So, take your shoes off, relax, pretend you’re on vacation for a few minutes and enjoy the photos below.

This is Cove Point Lodge which is on the shore of Lake Superior.  Our room was on the first floor and had a deck.  (If I wouldn’t have been taking the picture I would have waved for you.)

Cove Point Lodge, Beaver Bay, Minnesota

Cove Point Lodge, Beaver Bay, Minnesota

The view from our room was stupendous! Breathe in, breathe out. Fresh air and sunshine. Enough to give the capillaries something to talk about.  (hehe)

Imagine waking up to this every morning.

Lake Superior, Sunrise

Lake Superior, Sunrise

There was more than a gentle wind today. It reminded me of how life’s circumstances push us this way and that and we’re always forced to bend but always seem to straighten ourselves back up.  Although sometimes we don’t straighten all the way back up.

Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN

Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN

Right here ~ I’d like to have a cabin right here with this view. No?

Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN

Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN

These rocks seem to have been positioned for this picture.  Now, how did that happen?  The ebb and flow of the water has put them there without asking for their opinion. They didn’t fight they just “went along.”  If rocks could be “at peace” then these rocks would be the epitome of that.

Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN

Lake Superior Beaver Bay, MN

A drive around the area brought us to Lax Lake.  Where oh where are all the people and why aren’t they out on a boat, canoe or kayak on such a beautiful day?

Lax Lake, Minnesota

Lax Lake, Minnesota

Lax Lake, Minnesota

Lax Lake, Minnesota

Lax Lake, MN

Lax Lake, MN

Further into our drive we stopped at a place called Sugarloaf Cove.  Sugarloaf is working to restore and preserve the North Shore of Lake Superior. A very cool place to visit.  The staff is very well informed of the area and of what it will take to preserve it.

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Hmmm … Beach or Trail? How about both?!!

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

The puffy clouds mingle with the blue sky and hang over the deep blue water causing the mind to find rest.

Lake Superior from Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Lake Superior from Sugarloaf Cove, MN

We took a different trail back to the visitor center which led us through majestic trees.

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

Sugarloaf Cove, MN

On our way home we stopped at the Split Rock Lighthouse which is in Two Harbors, MN.  We were a little disappointed that the fee they charge to get into the park doesn’t include the tour to the lighthouse. Our choices were to pay for the tour or find a trail that leads to the lighthouse that is a tad bit longer.  We chose the latter.

Lake Superior near Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Lake Superior near Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

The walk to get a picture of the lighthouse wasn’t too bad …

Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Just a little closer …

Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Unfortunately we didn’t get much closer than that as this was the way “up” and we didn’t want to spend more time here …

Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Split Rock Lighthouse, MN

Well, would YOU have gone?

My enjoyment of trees, especially birch, was not denied on this trip. Something about these trees clumped in a group gives me a sense of awe.

Birch Trees, MN

Birch Trees, MN

Here the birch trees reach high into the blue sky as if reaching for heaven.

Birch Trees, MN

Birch Trees, MN

The three days we were gone seemed like a week to me. Taking in so much beauty in a short amount of time really does revive and elevate the senses.

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Gorilla, Como Park Zoo
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The Como Park Zoo

On a very warm day in St. Paul, we headed to the Como Park Zoo. I was glad that it is a small zoo so we were able to stroll through and take our time.

The animals seemed lethargic ~ perhaps the weather affects them more than I thought.  Or maybe they simply weren’t happy.

They didn’t seem to move very much ~ even the sea lion just lay there.

Sea Lion, Como Park Zoo

Sea Lion, Como Park Zoo

The gorilla seemed pensive ~ what do gorillas think about, I wonder?

Gorilla, Como Park Zoo

Gorilla, Como Park Zoo

I was able to get pretty close to the zebra. It is quite a fascinating animal with all the stripes and it’s large muscles.  Did you know that the strip pattern on every zebra is unique? Check it out sometime.

Zebra, Como Park Zoo

Zebra, Como Park Zoo

Zebra, Como Park Zoo

Zebra, Como Park Zoo

Zebra, Como Park Zoo

Zebra, Como Park Zoo

The giraffe was the most active out of all the animals.

Giraffe, Como Park Zoo

Giraffe, Como Park Zoo

Did you know that a male lion’s roar can be heard up to 5 miles away?

Lion, Como Park Zoo

Lion, Como Park Zoo

This tiger just lay on its back ~ too hot to move?

Tiger, Como Park Zoo

Tiger, Como Park Zoo

Most of the other animals were “hiding.”

The zoo has a few places to pick up some goodies and drinks.

Hopefully the next time we go the animals will be a little more active (chipper).

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The Candy Squares Lap Quilt
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A Laptop Quilt

I am still a beginner when it comes to quilting. Perhaps it’s because I don’t quilt every day. I usually do one project every 3-6 months and then spring/summer roll around and I’m back to the stress of yard work.

The lap top quilt I recently made is called Candy Squares and is quite pretty.  I bought the kit on Craftsy which came with all of the fabric material except for the batting and the backing.

Unfortunately, the first kit I received from them which had both off white Kona yardage and 100 5″ colored fabric squares had the wrong size colored squares so I emailed them and they sent me another kit and allowed me to keep the first one.  That actually made sense since I hadn’t measured the fabric material when I received it and had already cut the off white material by following the instructions.

Lesson learned.  I’ll make sure to measure the fabric before I start a project.

The instructions said I should press the fabric first so that’s what I did.  It does not recommend washing as the fabric pieces are quite small.

I started the project by cutting 70 of the 5″ squares into 2.5 x 2.5 inch squares.  This is time consuming because I needed to make sure the cuts were precise.   The remaining 5″ squares (all 30 of them) are cut into two pieces each ~ 2½” x 5” rectangles for the binding.

I’m considering getting a Cricut which, although a little expensive, is supposed to cut a lot more accurately than I can.  I thought perhaps I was the only one having problems cutting precisely but many experienced quilters say they have had the same problem.

I love the vivid

 

 

Fossil Fern Charms

Fossil Fern Charms

Next I cut the 3 yards of Kona White fabric into 13 2½” strips and then sub cut it into 200 2½” squares.  Then I cut 9 6½” strips and sub cut those into 49 6½” squares.

That’s a lot of cutting for sure!

The quilt has a pattern as such:

Row 1 = color – white – color

Row 2 = white – color – white

Row 3 = color – white – color

Fossil Fern Charms

Fossil Fern Charms

The colored fabric is chosen randomly and is sewn to the white color as stated above.

You need to make sure you have lots of pins for this project and a pincushion comes in handy.

Pin Cushion

Pin Cushion

I pinned each set of two squares and sewed them together.

Sew Squares Together

Sew Squares Together

I continued feeding the sewing machine the sets of squares with a little space between them and later snipped that thread off.  Then I added the third square.

Sew Pieces Continuously

Sew Pieces Continously

Separate the sewn rows

Separate the sewn rows

Next I put 3 rows of squares together to make a 9 piece square.

IMG_2392

If you’ll notice, I made two different sets ~ the first had white on each end with a colored fabric in the middle and the second had colored pieces on the ends and a white piece in the middle.  I then put those in separate piles.

I simply love the vibrant colors in this quilt.

IMG_2374

Eventually you’ll be using 3 of these to make a larger square.

It is VERY important that the fabric is cut precisely or you’ll have problems later on trying to match pieces. But, don’t worry too much over it. I’m still trying to be a perfectionist at quilting but more and more I read of how it’s okay to let some of these things go.

Below is a picture of one large square that is not lined up very well.  Blah.

Here is one that is much much better.

Sewing The Squares Together

Sewing The Squares Together

I made 50 of these blocks and I starched each one. Whew!

 

Since this is a lap quilt, I used a king size bed to put the sewn squares on.  This allowed me to see how the colors were lining up.  As you can see, one large white square is sewn in between the color combination ones.

IMG_2414

After all the rows were completed, I was able to step back and look to make sure I didn’t have colors that were next to each other to give it a more random look.

For this quilt I used a very light batting since I wasn’t sure who it might be given to (any ideas?) and I know folks all over the U.S.  I also decided not to pin the top, batting and backing together but used a basting spray instead which worked quite well.

To reiterate, this is what the kit came with and what is needed:

  • 1 Charm Pack of Fossil Fern fabrics – 100 5″ Squares (included in the kit)
  • 3 Yards Kona Cotton in snow/white
  • Backing: 3 5/8 yard (need to purchase)
  • Batting: 62″ x 74″ (need to purchase)

The finished size is 54″ x 66″.

For the backing, I asked a couple of friends what color they thought would work and I used a burgundy color but any color would have worked.

After I checked to make sure everything was pieced together correctly (it wasn’t ~ I had a few pieces I had to hand sew as they had separated for some reason), I washed the quilt on delicate and in cold water. Then I checked again to make sure all the pieces were still together. I noticed that a few had come undone.  Blah again!  So, I hand sewed those and it was finally finished.

Here’s the final product which is quite pretty.

The Candy Squares Lap Quilt

The Candy Squares Lap Quilt

 

 

 

 

 

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A Strange Visitor

On a beautiful sunny afternoon, I stepped outside all decked out in my mosquito gear (jeans, long sleeve shirt and hat) along with my mosquito cologne (deet) to work in the yard.

Making sure my small wagon had all the supplies I needed, I headed to the back of the house to weed. What a perfect day, I thought to myself, as I started my weeding.

After an hour or so I looked around and decided that perhaps I needed a larger shovel so I headed back to the garage.

Walking to the front door of the garage, I noticed a turkey “hanging out.” Uh, no, I don’t think so. I waved my arms and scared it away. That was easy ~ or so I thought.

After making sure the turkey ran well into the woods, I grabbed my shovel and headed back to do more weeding. Feeling quite accomplished at the work I had completed in a couple of hours, I put everything into my wagon and headed back to the garage to put my tools away.

Then I noticed “it” on the ground.  A white blotchy substance made a path into my garage. Hmmm …

What could that be?

Putting the wagon away, I followed the “path” into the garage. Next to the car. Next to the bicycles. Back to the shop.

Then my eyes followed the path up a table where she was …

Sitting on top of my deck cushions was the largest meanest looking turkey who had made a “poop” path.

Turkey

Turkey

Uh, okay, what do I do now? I knew that this required much deep thinking …

At first, I tried reasoning with the turkey and scolded her for being in the garage.  Then I pointed to the garage entrance and asked her to leave. “Go on” I said in my stern (probably incomprehensible) voice.  After a few minutes of coaching, I came to the realization that this was not going to work. (Uh, you think?)

Naturally I put my thinking cap back on and thought about this logically.

Let’s see now ~ turkeys have wings and, as I’ve observed, don’t fly much which makes them similar to chickens. Of course!  What a bright idea I had!

In the shriek-i-est voice I could muster, I clucked. And clucked … and clucked … and, hmmm … I don’t think the clucking was working very well as I was getting very odd looks from this turkey.

Okay so I had to think a little deeper. I mean, I had to really think like a turkey. (hahaha)

I finally thought I had the solution to my problem.

In my shriek-i-est voice I clucked again but this time I flapped my arms and started walking out of the garage. I tried this several times as I thought about the story of the Pied Piper who used a magic pipe to lure rats away from a town. I did this for, oh, ten minutes or so. (Where is a camera to make a video for YouTube when you need it?  This probably would have garnered a million views ~ yes?)

Well, do you think it worked?

Sorry to say, all the turkey did was turn its head from one side to the other trying to figure out what I was doing.  At least I made it think, no?

I was down to my last resort ~ waiting til my husband came home from work in a half hour.

And husband was quite bold about the whole matter. He simply took the end of a broom and poked it gently and this HUGE turkey flew out of the garage.  You should have seen the wingspan on that thing!

So ~ what’s the lesson in all of this?

Never ~ ever ~ try to think like a turkey.  (laughing)

 

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Replacing A Well Pump

We were having water “issues” for quite awhile ~ stinky smelling water, rusty water, etc. I knew in my gut something was wrong as our neighbor across the street told us his water is clear and good-tasting.

So it was that one morning my husband woke me up and said “We have no water.” Blearily I got up to check and, yes, we had no water (now, why would I have doubted him?). I’m not sure what type of help I could be but, hey, gotta support the husband. I called our home warranty company and they told me they would have a contractor call me to come take a look.

In the meantime, husband headed downstairs to where the water heater, water softener, etc. are located and turned the water softener on and off.  Whala!  The water came back.  So, I sheepishly called the home warranty company back and canceled the appointment.

The water seemed to have very low pressure though and throughout the day I tried to conserve as much water as I could. The next morning we woke up to no water again.  Bah!

A not-so-quick call to our home warranty company and within a couple hours I had an appointment for someone to come to see what the problem was.

Sure enough ~ the well water pump had to be replaced.  And so our journey began.

Below is a picture of the well cap which goes over the casing that has the pipes that go to the well pump. The company will remove this cap and have to pull pipes from here to get to the water pump.

Well Cap

Well Cap

Here’s a picture of the men working to remove the well cap and getting the truck ready to remove the pipes from inside the casing.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

The top of the truck had this long “tower” that has a cable on it so each pipe can be pulled out since the well is approximately 179 feet deep.

P1130301

Replacing A Well Pump

The first pipe came out easily, was galvanized and looked quite clean.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

A large wrench was used to turn the galvanized pipe to help with its removal.

P1130323

Replacing A Well Pump

The rest of the pipes were made of PVC material.

P1130326

Replacing A Well Pump

The further down the pipe was the dirtier it looked as it was removed.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

The wrench was quite helpful in removing one pipe from another.

P1130334

Replacing A Well Pump

And sometimes more than one wrench had to be used.

P1130335

Replacing A Well Pump

The cable was quite long and each time one pipe appeared it was removed from the cable and set to the side.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Notice how the pipes are joined together.

P1130340

Replacing A Well Pump

Here are a couple of the PVC pipes.  As they were pulled up the men would use their gloved hand to remove the water & rust that came up with it.

P1130346

Replacing A Well Pump

Look at how black the last pipe appears.  It is attached to the well pump.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

And here is the well pump which is 4 inches.

P1130350

Replacing A Well Pump

I guess after 22 years it’s bound to get dirty, no?

P1130352

Replacing A Well Pump

Here’s a close up of the well pump.  In laymen’s terms ~ yuck!

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Unfortunately, well pumps can’t be cleaned.  I wonder why that is? Perhaps since it takes so long and costs so much to remove them it makes more sense just to replace them.

P1130364

Replacing A Well Pump

This is just gross looking to me.  Normally (well, okay, maybe it’s not normal) I would ask a contractor to leave the part so I can inspect it but I wasn’t sure how I would dispose of it later so I didn’t keep the old well pump.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

And tada!  Here’s the new one.

P1130368

Replacing A Well Pump

The pump has to go back down in the casing along with the pipes they pulled out.  Uh, of course!  (laughing)

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

It looked so pretty I hated to see it go down into that deep dark pit …. (laughing)

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

But, down it went!

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

It had to be attached to the cable to guide it down the casing. And, wouldn’t you know it?  It didn’t fit.  Argghhhh!

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Because of all the guck in the well casing, they had to change out the 4″ well pump for a 3″ well pump.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

And down it went … I felt sorry for the gentleman on the phone with the home warranty company as he was on hold practically the whole time he was working which was over 45 minutes.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

The PVC pipe now had to be connected to the well pump one pipe at a time.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

They used what I believe to be electrical tape to make sure the pipes stayed together.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Here’s a close up of the cable contraption.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

A hose was attached to a spigot so that they could make sure that all the nasty water was taken out.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

They started pumping the water out of the well and …

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Black gold! We struck oil!  Naw, just kidding …

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

And now ~ it’s clear!  Success!  They allowed the water to flow for about 15 minutes to make sure it stayed clear.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

The last pipe had to be placed before they put the well cap back on.

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

 

Replacing A Well Pump

Replacing A Well Pump

And that is how they replaced the well pump.  Whew!!!

I told my husband this looked easy to do but who wants to pay for an expensive truck with a long cable that will sit around until you need it once every 15 or so years?

This was quite an adventure for me and I’m grateful that the contractors allowed me to take pictures.  Quite fascinating!

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A Busy Yet Lazy Summer

It’s been a little over 4 weeks since I’ve posted anything new.

Summer has been both “slow” and also gone by quickly.  I spent a couple of weeks preparing for guests and another two weeks with guests in the house. During that time I did minimal yard work, cooking and little of anything else except being a hostess.

Not sure what I’ll be doing about yard work as the weather here has been hot and humid.  It didn’t help that I got bitten by three ticks.  Ughh.  We got them off almost right away but I still have the fear of getting Lyme disease which the black legged ticks can transmit.

Unfortunately? the three ticks I had were really small ~ nymphs they are called ~ so I couldn’t see their legs.  I’m considering going to the doctor to get tested for Lyme disease as a “just in case.”  It can be treated with antibiotics but only if it’s caught early.

I don’t really have any symptoms although lately I’ve had a sinus headache, backache and have felt tired.  I can also attribute that to the weather though.

Right now it feels like we are living in a dense forest.  With all the rain we’ve had in Minnesota, we are no longer in a drought and all of the saplings have become young adults (hahaha ~ that’s my attempt at a joke).

Seriously though, we probably have 15 saplings that need to come down and 5 really large trees that also must come down. It has to happen because I can’t live in darkness.  All this shade makes me somber and lethargic.

Fortunately, for my birthday this summer my husband asked me what I wanted and I told him I wanted a bunch of trees felled and, guess what?  He agreed!  Yippity do da!

The areas on our property that I cleared last year of buckthorn and of the garlic mustard plant look pretty good this year. Well, at least the buckthorn didn’t grow back but the garlic mustard continues to prosper much to my dismay. I have used 2 large containers of Roundup this year to kill this weed but unfortunately I may wind up purchasing another container before summer is over.

So ~ since summer has been kind’ve lazy, I haven’t been trying new recipes. That should change here come September.

I have a backlog of things to share that have been happening so ~ stay tuned.

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Corned Beef Hash
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Paleo Corned Beef Hash

Saturday evenings I normally look for easy recipes to make and this Corned Beef Hash was perfect.  Add roasted brussel sprouts, fresh petite tomatoes and a fried egg and you’ve got a winner.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. can of corned beef
  • 1 large sweet potato cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 3 Tbsp ghee (or butter)
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and diced small
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • Pepper and Salt, to taste

Directions

  1. In a medium sized skillet, add 2 tablespoons of ghee on low heat.
  2. When the ghee is melted, add the onion and jalapeno and saute until the onions are clear.
  3. Add the sweet potato and corned beef then stir this together for about 10 minutes.
  4.  Add the remaining tablespoon of ghee then turn up the heat and cook until the potato becomes crisp. (Use a fork to poke through one of the pieces to make sure it’s soft and cooked through.)
  5. When the mixture is cooked through, add the basil and season with the salt and pepper.

This can be made for breakfast, brunch or a quick lunch.

Corned Beef Hash

Corned Beef Hash

I am not a big fan of canned “anything” but wanted something that was truly quick. Keep in mind that canned corned beef does have quite a bit of sodium though.

Hope you enjoy it!

For more paleo recipes, click here.

 

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The Rose
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Getting To Know Each Other

Surface relationships. Have you ever had one? Are you in one now?

As Christians we sometimes wear masks to appear godly ~ to appear as if we are in control of our own lives.

The trouble with this facade is that people don’t really get to know us and the relationship is dwarfed.

I came across this Scripture in my reading today:

“… because we loved you so much, we were delighted to share with you not only the gospel of God but our lives as well.”  1 Thessalonians 2:8

Paul hits the nail on the head when he embraces a fuller relationship with others.

It’s not enough for us to share the gospel with each other. The real “meat” in a relationship comes when we are able to share our lives with each other thus being able to uplift and encourage and yes, have those belly laughs together.

Weaknesses, strengths, hurts, joys, temptations ~ why do we hide behind facades of joy most of the time?

Our journey on this earth is short. Trust me ~ time truly does appear to fly the older you get.

Don’t be afraid to share who you are.

Just as Jesus accepts us where we are, we too need to accept people where they are and hopefully be accepted in the same way.

Is this risky? Sure ~ you may be hurt if you’re rejected or misunderstood. But what if you’re not?

Food for thought:  “There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. The one who fears is not made perfect in love.” 1 John 4:18

Let’s try to love ~ truly love ~ and come out from behind our masks.

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Paleo Sambal Oelek
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Paleo Sambal Oelek

I adapted a recipe I found online for this Paleo Sambal Oelek that I recently used in a Spicy Beef that I made. The original recipe made gobs of this and I really didn’t want a bunch sitting in my refrigerator ~ possibly spoiling if I didn’t use it right away.

This Sambal Oelek has a spicy sweet flavor to it.  If you want it more spicy, reduce the maple sugar by 1 tablespoon and/or you can add another pepper. Either way will work.

First, here are the ingredients you’ll be needing (salt not shown) ~

Ingredients for Paleo Sambal Oelek

Ingredients for Paleo Sambal Oelek

Ingredients

  • 1 Red Fresco Pepper (or any spicy pepper of your choosing) seeds removed
  • 4 cloves of garlic peeled and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and chopped fine
  • 1 – 2 stalks lemongrass (I actually used only 1 ~ the white part only), sliced thinly
  • 2 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons pure maple sugar
  • Salt (to taste)
  • 1 tablespoon lime zest, chopped

Directions

  1. In a mortar and pestle, add the pepper, garlic, ginger and the lemon grass then grind/crush it as fine as you can. (You can also use a blender instead but I found this more fun.)
  2. Add the vinegar to the mortar and pestle and mix everything together.
  3. In a small saucepan, add the ground mixture and bring this to a boil.
  4. Reduce the heat to a simmer then add the maple syrup to the saucepan and stir everything together for a few minutes.
  5. Add the salt and the lime zest then stir to combine.
  6. Remove from the stovetop and add to whatever dish you’re making.

Remember ~ this has a sweet ‘n spicy flavor to it. Feel free to make it less sweet and more spicy or vice versa. It took me a long time but I can look at a recipe now and know whether I need to adjust it or not (I was a slow learner).

Next ~ enjoy!  I added this to a Paleo Spicy Beef dish I made and it came out great.

Paleo Sambal Oelek

Paleo Sambal Oelek

For more paleo recipes, click here.

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