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Lingual Nerve Damage

Brrr … its cold outside this morning but I had a chiropractor appointment so I forced myself out of my warm bed. Looking outside, the leaves still look a little wet from the recent rain we’ve received. Rain that, unfortunately, will still not get us out of the drought we’re in.

I enjoy going to see my chiropractor. He was referred to me by a masseuse that I go to every now and then. I trust her and her healing hands truly help me with my stiff neck. Just recently I asked her if she knew of a chiropractor that might work with lingual nerve damage and she said she knew of one who worked with laser treatment on nerves that might be able to help.

That’s how I found my chiropractor. He was a good listener from day one and suggested that the laser treatment he uses just might help as it helps with other nerve problems.

Initially I went to see him twice a week. The first laser treatment I received made me believe I was definitely going to be healed of this lingering problem (caused by a dentist trying to numb my mouth during a root canal).

The laser they use is an Avicenna laser. It is supposed to help in stimulating deep tissue healing. Although the chiropractor had never tried it with lingual nerve damage he was optimistic enough for me to say “let’s try it.”

Almost 6 weeks later I can say that I have definitely noticed a difference on the left side of my mouth. My tongue doesn’t have a continual burning or discomfort/pain most days. The laser treatment I receive is very simple. They point the laser on my face where the lingual nerve connects to the rest of the mouth and for 10 minutes they move the laser back and forth. After 10 minutes, I open my mouth and they point the laser inside my mouth towards the lingual nerve and work that area for another 5 minutes.

I’ve read other blogs of people who have this problem and no one has yet suggested this remedy. I was on the verge of going to see my oral facial surgeon to see if there was anything that can be done. From internet reading, the lingual nerve “might” heal itself in 2 months or 20 years. That’s a LOT of time to be in pain and I’m already at 1 year and 7 months.

I am thankful that I can try this FDA approved laser treatment and hope that it will speed up the healing of my lingual nerve sooner rather than later. It certainly seems like I’m well on my way.

I’m not sure if this is covered by insurance though as my insurance doesn’t cover chiropractic visits so I pay out of pocket and reimburse myself through the Health Savings Plan.

Has anyone else tried this kind of therapy for lingual nerve damage? I’d be interested in hearing from you.

Update: March 22, 2013

The laser therapy had worked very well and my lingual nerve problems had completely gone away by the beginning of 2013. Because I had also had problems with TMJ, the chiropractor referred me to a dentist he knew so I could have a proper mouth guard made. TMJ, according to the chiropractor, can exacerbate the lingual nerve.

However, when I became sick with bronchitis in February, the lingual nerve started acting up again. I will be heading back to the chiropractor next week.

The chiropractor had also explained that inflammation in the body can prevent the lingual nerve from healing so I should be careful with what I ate and he recommended removing sugar (except for occasional honey and pure maple syrup), gluten and dairy from my diet. At first, I was hesitant to do this because I didn’t think my husband would go along with it.

When my son came to visit in December, he decided he wanted to cook for us and in January started us on a paleolithic diet which is gluten free, dairy free (except for eggs) and sugar free. Funny how life has worked things out.

I believe that the lingual nerve is better because of the diet, i.e. it’s not as bad during this recurrence as it was initially when it first started.

So I’m hoping that this is a minor setback for me as it took almost four weeks for me to recuperate from the bronchitis which is a big inflammation causer.

 

 

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